SITE_header_businessweek
SITE_slider_economic SITE_slider_future SITE_slider_greatest SITE_slider_LEO SITE_slider_the-difference_2

Quality & You

What does Quality mean to You?

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 115
    [post_author] => 5
    [post_date] => 2013-01-19 18:53:43
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-19 18:53:43
    [post_content] => When I ask people, “what does Quality mean to you?” I hear a wide range of answers. For some people, their answer is, “Quality means putting out the best product or service possible.”  Others may say, “Honesty and trust.” Many will tell you, “Quality means doing the right thing at the right time.” Still others will say, “Quality is a resistance to compromise.” However, more often than not, I still hear “ I have no idea, that’s why we have a quality department,” or “Hey let me ask my Vice President of Quality,” or even worse yet, “I’m not sure what quality means to me.”

[pullquote]I would like to see a day when we don’t hesitate about our response toward Quality.[/pullquote]

Ideally, I would like to see a day when we don’t hesitate about our response toward Quality; when everyone has a fearless reaction to Quality just like they do with everyday events.  Bottom line, everyone, needs make Quality a priority, and a part of everything they do.  When we all understand the impact of our actions, how even the smallest action may pay enormous dividends, then that leads to the path of true quality: preventing human error; possessing the kind of oversight and engrained thought that corrects misjudgments before they have a chance to trigger problems.

What a world this could be if we all were that much more attentive; that much more in tune, and truly understood and believed the dramatic impact that Quality can have on all of us!
    [post_title] => What does Quality mean to You?
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => what-does-quality-mean-to-you
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2013-04-17 13:24:59
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-04-17 13:24:59
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://subirchowdhury.com/?p=115
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
When I ask people, “what does Quality mean to you?” I hear a wide range of answers. For some people, their answer is, “Quality means putting out the best...

Quality & Economics

Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE)

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 895
    [post_author] => 4
    [post_date] => 2012-09-18 15:03:23
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-18 15:03:23
    [post_content] => LOGO_london-school-economics

The Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics allows for any post-doctoral scholar in-residence to participate in the program, regardless of ethnicity or national origin and spend time at LSE engaging in research examining the impact of “people quality” and behavior on the economies of Asian nations prioritizing, but not restricted to, India and Bangladesh.

Ultimately, the “Subir Chowdhury Fellow” is expected to successfully complete one publishable research paper during their stay and make a presentation at a seminar or lecture arranged by the Asia Research Centre. The Fellowship has been awarded to the following individuals:
2014-15 Dr Saurabh Kumar CUTS International
Click Here - For more information about Dr. Kumar's work.
2013-14 Dr Srijit Mishra Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research
Click Here - For more information about Dr Mishra's work.
2012-13 Dr Mrutuyanjaya Sahu Jawaharlal Nehru University
Click Here - For more information about Dr Sahu's work.
2011-2012 Dr. Vanishree Joseph Indira Gandhi National Open University
Click Here - For more information about Dr. Joseph's work.
2010-2011 Dr. Rahul Hiremath Walchand Institute of Technology and Birla Institute of Technology & Science
Click Here - For more information about Dr. Hiremath's work.
Click Here for more information regarding The Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE). [post_title] => Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => subir-chowdhury-fellowship-on-quality-and-economics-at-the-london-school-of-economics-lse [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-23 16:45:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-23 16:45:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://subirchowdhury.com/?p=895 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
The Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics allows for any post-doctoral scholar in-residence to participate in the program, regardless of ethnicity or national origin and spend time at...

Quality & Process

Watch Your Flow, Keep Control

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 173
    [post_author] => 5
    [post_date] => 2013-02-25 21:02:10
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-02-25 21:02:10
    [post_content] => When I watch organizations, I am reminded of a swiftly flowing river.

Starting with raw materials at the river’s source and ending with finished products or services flowing from its mouth, overlaying processes flow into and onto one another. When everything is running smoothly, it is a wonderful thing to behold. But much like a river, no production runs perfectly straight and smooth. There are twists and turns where the flow must adjust and maneuver around obstacles that get in the way.

However, the "flow and process" is often broken by changes in policies or conditions in the delivery chain, employees that overlook important issues, and staffing arrangements that leave us waiting in endless lines. And that’s the reality. Companies of every size and from every industry contend with flawed process flow as energy and profitability slowly bleed away.

Managers at a large mid-western hospital were spending their days and weeks tearing out their hair, trying to figure out the source of unacceptably large numbers of no-shows and last-minute cancellations for medical tests.

[pullquote]At the end of the day, rather than waste your energy trying to straighten out the flow, focus your effort on flattening out the curves and minimizing interruptions as much as possible.[/pullquote]

The problem was long in running. In some cases, patients were not receiving tests they needed therefore causing disruptions in the hospital’s schedules and lost revenue. To compound matters, staff time had ratcheted up as administrators and practitioners scrambled to stem the day-to-day scheduling problems and reschedule the canceling patients.

Management suspected that a major source of the problem was due to patients’ inability to obtain timely approval from their insurance carriers for the tests. We turned to our Listen methodology and asked staffers to call patients themselves. The subsequent interviews revealed that many patients had forgotten their appointments. Many others didn’t know which of the hospital’s many buildings they were supposed to go. Still others who remembered their appointments and managed to find the correct office, discovered at the appointment window that they had failed to follow pre-test preparations (e.g., fasting) and had to reschedule. Insurance, as it turned out, was of minimal consequence. It was clear to all that the patient preparation process was either non-existent or completely ineffective.

At my suggestion, managers examined best practices at other hospitals. They cataloged some common sense ideas for managing patient preparation procedures and paid special attention on departments in their own organization that seemed to be dealing with the situation better than other departments.

In a matter of a week or so, they had drafted two ways that the hospital staff could rectify the situation. First, patients must receive full explanations in print regarding their test, including a map that showed exactly where they had to go. Then, all patients received a phone call reminder for their appointment, plus a reminder (when applicable) about pre-test preparations. After the new patient preparation process was up and running, the hospital reported a 50% reduction in cancellations. The flow was fixed.

No company’s operations ever achieve total perfection. Among the companies that handle the twists and turns quite well, they move around the flow a seasoned sports team. Attentive members use strong communication between other members to assess changes quickly and make on-the-spot adjustments as situations require.

At the end of the day, rather than waste your energy trying to straighten out the flow, focus your effort on flattening out the curves and minimizing interruptions as much as possible. Work toward perfection, but don’t expect it to achieve it today.
    [post_title] => Watch Your Flow, Keep Control
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => watch-flow-control
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-05-22 17:06:48
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-05-22 17:06:48
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://subirchowdhury.com/?p=173
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
When I watch organizations, I am reminded of a swiftly flowing river. Starting with raw materials at the river’s source and ending with finished products or services flowing from its...

Quality & Me

What is your difference?

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 1497
    [post_author] => 5
    [post_date] => 2016-11-07 11:41:02
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-07 11:41:02
    [post_content] => In the past two decades, I have helped countless organizations improve their processes to find greater success. But over the years, something began to haunt me. I noticed that some organizations using the exact same process or methodology realized enormous savings, while others stumbled. I kept wondering, what is the difference?

I have found my own answers to that: it is not process alone, it is also the 'mindset' of each of the employees at all levels and functions of an organization that makes a big difference. In my forthcoming book, The Difference: When Good Enough Isn't Enough I share the secrets of the 'caring mindset'. But I wanted to know what others had to say.  I have reached out to people who inspire me, and asked them this simple question:

“What's the one thing that made the biggest difference in your life and work?”

The answers I have received are astounding.
  • David Meerman Scott reflected on a key mistake that he and many others make.
  • James Altucher spoke of the types of people you need to avoid.
  • Chris Guillebeau boiled it down to one shift in his mindset that changed everything.
And there are so many others. People are reaching out to me to share their experiences as they move to make a difference: in their homes with their families, at their workplace, in their communities... and beyond. In the coming weeks, I will be sharing what people share with me under the #MyDifference hashtag on social media. I invite you to share what has made the difference in your life. Get everyone's attention and use the hashtag #MyDifference. You can also join me on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn to read more personal accounts of how others found a positive difference that changed their life for the better. What is your difference? [post_title] => What is your difference? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => what-difference [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-11-18 13:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-11-18 13:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://subirchowdhury.com/?p=1497 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
In the past two decades, I have helped countless organizations improve their processes to find greater success. But over the years, something began to haunt me. I noticed that...