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Quality & Economics

The question of quality runs far deeper than business. When quality fails at the societal level, we fail each other. Then the real danger is that we fail to govern efficiently and fairly.

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Subir’s Reading List

BOOK-QE_end-this-depression-now_paul-krugman
BOOK-QE_first-principles_john-taylor
BOOK-QE_grand-pursuit_sylvia-nasar
BOOK-QE_how-the-west-was-lost_dambisa-moyo
BOOK-QE_price-of-inequality_joseph-stiglitz
BOOK-QE_thinking-fast-and-slow_daniel-kahneman
BOOK-QE_why-nations-fail_acemoglu-robinson

Books by Subir

The Power of LEO
The Ice Cream Maker
Next Generation Business Handbook
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Taguchi's Quality Engineering Handbook
The Power of Design for Six
The Power of Six Sigma
Organization 21c
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Cover_mahalanobis-taguchi
Cover_DFSS-1
Cover_robust-engineering
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Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics at Harvard University

Expanding the outreach of Subir Chowdhury's global call for quality throughout society - at all levels - a Fellowship on Quality and Economics has been established at Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The goal: to explore the impact of quality and economics in the United States.

Expanding the outreach of Subir Chowdhury’s global call for quality throughout society – at all levels – a Fellowship on Quality and Economics has been established at Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The goal: to explore the impact of quality and economics in the United States.

Each year, the “Subir Chowdhury Fellow” will be entrusted with the task of examining the impact of “people and process” and quality on the economic advancement of the United States. This is a graduate Fellowship for doctoral students and will be awarded annually. Applications for the fellowship is open to for any scholar, regardless of ethnicity or national origin, who wishes to spend time at Harvard studying “Quality and Economics” in preparation for their doctoral thesis on this topic.

The first Subir Chowdhury Fellowship will be selected for the 2013-2014 academic year.

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Thanks and gratitude are extended to all those who helped make the Fellowship at Harvard possible, especially (pictured left below, with Subir Chowdhury) Dr. Margot Gill, Administrative Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and (pictured right below) Dr. Amaryta Sen, Nobel Laureate and Thomas W. Lamont University Professor and professor of economics and philosophy.

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More on Quality & Economics

A Little Salmonella May Not Kill You, but it May Kill your Economy

Quality processes affect more than business. When it involves a country’s ability to maintain and regulate safety, poor quality management can damage the entire economic infrastructure of an industry, even a nation.

Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE)

The Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics allows for any post-doctoral scholar in-residence to participate in the program, regardless of ethnicity or national origin and spend time at LSE engaging in research examining the impact of “people quality” and behavior on the economies of Asian nations prioritizing, but not restricted to, India and Bangladesh.

A Moment of Truth for the Solar Panel Industry

A 5.5% to 22% defect rate in solar modules is more than just a manufacturing problem. It's a moment of truth for the entire industry.

A Tale of Two Countries

Two natural disasters reveal the difference of cultural and national expressions of quality in very profound ways.

Subir Chowdhury Fellowship on Quality and Economics at Harvard University

Expanding the outreach of Subir Chowdhury's global call for quality throughout society - at all levels - a Fellowship on Quality and Economics has been established at Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The goal: to explore the impact of quality and economics in the United States.

Whose political crisis is this, anyhow?

Questions persist as to whether our representatives can actually manage the country’s business. But whose fault is that, really?